Skip to main content

About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CNNW 12
MSNBCW 5
KPIX (CBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23
, don't worry as much about the deficit, the revenues will come in, and we have to get rid of the social safety net the way it's been, and cut spending, slash spending dramatically. it was very divided policywise and barack obama won pretty handily. >> a week after the election john boehner, speaker boehner, does a press statement and he says we're not going to raise revenues. we should look at loopholes and deductions. >> one thing that hasn't changed and you can put on as many senate republicans as you want looking reasonable. what hasn't changed is the tea party caucus in the house. they've lost a few members, but they're still a majority and john boehner has to find some way to get something past them. that's why i doubt there will be a christmastime deal. i think the president is going to have to let these tax cuts end and then boehner may have a chance of convincing them to pass tax cuts for the bottom 98% without the top 2%. >> do you agree with that, dr. peterson? that the president will be forced to allow these to run their course simply so that republicans in the house won't ha
the deadlines we're facing on taxes and deficits. these deadlines are going to be coming up very soon in the coming weeks. but today's important because i want to make sure everybody understands this debate is not just about numbers. it's a set of major decisions that are going to affect millions of families all across this country in very significant ways. and their voices, the voices of the american people, have to be part of this debate. and so i asked some friends of mine here to join me, some folks from here in the area. our ultimate goal is an agreement that gets our long-term deficit under control in a way that is fair and balanced. that kind of agreement would be good for our businesses, it would be good for our economy, it would be good for our children's future. and i believe that both parties can agree on a framework that does that in the coming weeks. in fact, my hope is to get this done before christmas. but -- the place where we already have in theory at least complete agreement, right now, is on middle-class taxes. and as i've said before, we have two choices. if congre
puts forward his plan. how is he going to close the other part of that deficit? you know, his proposal right now, the most he can say would raise would be about $68 billion when our deficit last year was $90 billion. what is the president's plan for closing the additional additional $1 trillion worth of deficit? i think that's incumbent on the president to put forward his plan. >> from your standpoint alone, there's no way you see fit in the coming 35 days that you would break that pledge with glove norquist. >> well, thomas, let's use a couple numbers here. even with this measly economic growth we've seen the last three years, revenue at the federal government has increased $344 billion per year. if we just return to a normal economy that returns about 18.5%, that would increase revenue an additional over $400 billion per year, that's $750 billion of revenue per year through economic growth. and the president, his proposal would raise 1/10 of that but would put at risk the economic growth and that $750 billion. so -- >> sir, with all due respect, though -- >> counterproductive. >> tha
senator pat toomey from pennsylvania. he was a member of the deficit reduction super committee last year that failed to agree on a plan. but he's been talking about this issue for a long, long time. good morning, senator. >> good morning. >> we just learned that president obama will be traveling to your backyard on friday to talk about the fiscal cliff and spending, and traveling to pennsylvania right now. is this a welcome visit as far as you're earned? >> as far as i'm concerned the president of the united states is always welcome in my state of pennsylvania. we welcome the president and look forward to his message, and i have some questions i'd like to-ish i hope he addresses. >> what questions? >> first of all the president seems absolutely determined to inflict a tax increase on the american people. two years ago he signed a bill that extended the current tax rates for two more years because he said the last thing you want to do is raise taxes in a weak economy. today the economy is weaker than it was two years ago. why in the world does he want to inflict that damage now? >> senato
as republicans have been trying to do since 2005 when we passed the deficit reduction act. >> let me jump to that, because part of the intriguing thing here is the fact that congressman cole, he is doing something that the president said, that post election news conference and that is, you know, extend the tax cut for everyone, but the wealthy, and then, you know, after you get that done, and i don't know if you would be going along with that, but nevertheless, you know, go ahead, talk about this long-term deal that would involve possible cuts as i think you're getting at, you know, cuts to programs like medicare. is that something we could see taking shape here? >> you're talking about getting rid of redundancies. great example, 342 economic development programs that are in the federal government system. let's start cleaning up these redundancies. let's do some of these across the board cuts in discretionary spending. let's make certain that medicare and social security, which are trust funds, not entitlements, they're trust funds, that they meet their obligation to our seniors and near seniors.
. >> reporter: but raising taxes is only one-half of a deficit deal. republicans want democrats to raise the eligibility age for medicare. >> i want entitlement reforms. republicans put revenue on the table, democrats always promise to cut spending. i'm looking for more revenue for entitlement reform before the end of the year. >> reporter: so far democrats sound lex flexible. >> we've got to make sure there is seamless coverage of afordable health coverage for every american. my concern about raising the retirement age gaps in coverage or coverage that's way too expensive for seniors to purchase. >> reporter: there are many potential cliffs but higher taxes for structural changes for medicaid and medicare may be abong the biggest. bob corker argued for both warning everyone against punting this until next year or accepting phony savings that don't solve or at least address the underlying deficit and structural debt problems. charlie and norah? >> let me add my voice, congratulations you on this day enharnting one of the big jobs in journalism. they're big shoes
loop holes and limiting deductions is not enough to make a dent in the nation's $16 trillion deficit. >> you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. those have to go up. they have to go up. >> reporter: but many republicans believe the best way to close the gap is reform entitlement programs like social security and medicare. democrats aren't on board yet. >> my concern about raising that medicare retirement age is there will be gaps in coverage or coverage that's way too expensive for seniors to purchase. >> reporter: and with the fiscal cliff looming, white house economists are warning shoppers concerned about a tax increase pay not spend as much this holiday season. danielle -- nottingham, cbs news. >>> investors are worried the strong start to the holiday shopping season may not last. right now, let's take a look at the dow. it's down nearly 60 points at this hour. >>> something that might help those numbers on wall street, cyber monday. it's expected to be the biggest online shopping day of the year. one data tracking firm predicts online sales
. so the biggest problem created the deficit that we have, the fiscal cliff that we're falling over is on spending. so this preoccupation with talking about taxes is talking about the smaller of the two problems that are causing the deficit. >> right. when you have a negotiation that's going on although the moment, 72% of americans according to the cnn poll believe obama and the gop should compromise to get thing off a cliff. we have to give and we see the difference ideologically, but in all kinds of trixie deductions and so on and a flat income tax increase on wealthy americans. what's the ideological difference. wealthier people pay a little more tax. >> it's not a ideological difference. what can raise the money most efficiently and effectively to create economic growth that's going to create jobs for people. one of the things i talked about during the campaign was cutting the corporate tax for manufacturing. you want to create jobs that are here in america that are going to create good-paying jobs that create things that people will consume here in it country. let's do somethin
.s. economy back into a recession. both congress and the white house are trying to make a deficit reduction deal to avoid the financial chaos. and president obama's reverting to some campaign mode right now to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public, but some say it's not a winning strategy. it doesn't take a gps to find the way to the fiscal cliff. much more difficult, finding the off ramp. at the president's first meeting with congressional leaders more than a week ago, there was a sense of optimism. >> my hope is is that this is going to be the beginning of a fruitful process. >> reporter: there was a follow-up phone call with house speaker john boehner, but a much different approach this week. the president's calendar is packed with sales pitches to the public, wh
is an integral part of deficit reduction. yes, from my side of the table bring entitlement reform into the conversation. social security, set aside. doesn't add to the deficit but when it comes to medicare and medicaid, protect the integrity of the program but give it solvency for more and more years. martha: alabama republican jeff sessions is the ranking member on the senate budget committee. senator sessions good morning. good to have you here today. >> martha, thank you. martha: a lot of talk this morning after these sunday shows and watching both sides talk about this fiscal cliff about who seems to be moving and in what direction. what are you hearing, what are you hearing from lindsey graham who says, quote he is willing to break that pledge on taxes under certain circumstances? what are they really saying? >> i'm not sure what they're saying. there's a lot of this talk going on. i don't know who is speaking for the republican party. the house of representatives where you have a substantial republican majority but the truth is that this country does not need to go through t
're willing to close tax loopholes to reduce the deficit, now we haven't yet seen that from congressional republican leaders, but we obviously are seeing it from prominent republicans you showed including senator graham and senator bob corker. >> question about two of those gentlemen here in a moment. cnn this morning talked to grover norquist, incumbents dare to break this pledge, dare to vote to raise taxes. the question was will he do it again? here's norquist. >> we would certainly highlight who has kept their commitment and who hasn't, but the point is historically the people who lose do so because the people in their state have figured that out. >> back to, i think, where you were going a moment ago, bob, it is interesting that when you look at the top two, two of the top republican senators we're talking about who are flirting to break this pledge, break with grover norquist and consider raising taxes on the wealthy they both face re-election in 2014. i'm talking about saxby chambliss and south carolina's lindsey graham. does that say to you that the political winds could be shifti
address the fundamental problem and driver of federal deficits and debt. and that's reforming these entitlement programs that are on an unsustainable path right now. >> so but remember the president also said when he extended the 35% tax rate for the upper income for those making more than $250,000 a year, he says -- he said then that was the last time he was going to do it. it was a one-shot deal. he wasn't going to do it anymore. and as you know he ran his re-election campaign on the notion he was going to increase the tax rates from 35% to 39.6% for those people making more than $250,000 a year. you think he's likely to blink on that? >> you know, i don't know. i hope he is at least willing to work with republicans. republicans are open for business up here. if he wants to bring entitlement reform into this discussion -- and you made the comment or showed dick durbin's comment this morning about that would be too hard to do. well, all the work's been done. you've had simpson bolls, a lot of work out there has been done. we know what the issues are and what it's going to tak
does not address the debt problem. we don't know how much we address the deficit problem by closing loopholes. impasse. martha: we'll see where that goes. stuart, thanks very much. we'll talk to chris van hollen moments away. bob,er is also here today. we'll get to some of that with them. thanks, stuart. bill: some context from how far the revenue ending bush tax cuts would go. during the 2012 fiscal year it costs $9.7 billion a day to run the federal government. the additional revenue stopping bush tax cuts would bring in $82.4 billion. a number that would run the government for 8 1/2 days. senator corker says there is plan on the table for two years. martha: that grand bargain that was so close. we'll see where that is in terms of both sides. bill:. we're just getting started on this tuesday morning. how about this story? oh, my gosh, a toddler seconds away from almost certain death in this video as a car comes barreling around that bend. we'll show you what the rest of what happens here and we'll tell you what ended up happening. bill: there is new violence on the streets of key
. property tax, that's another huge one. everybody says, yes, the deficit, it's all a big problem. and it's true. you can't continue to run these trillion-dollar deficits. but when you get down to the nitty-gritty about what you're actually going to cut, that's what's really hard, joe. >> if they don't fix it, it's going to be in everybody's backyard. thanks so much. >> that's right. >>> does the israel/gaza cease-fire prove that the u.s. can negotiate with what it's called a terror group? what about al qaeda? the implications next. load your, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> fresh clashes between protesters and riot p
, here's a fact. the president has on the table a proposal that reduces the deficit by $4 trillion. that is substance. so he has not waited for people to start smelling the jet fumes at national airport. he has actively put forward a plan. >> okay. welcome back to "morning joe." welcome back. christmas is coming. >> all right. >> can you believe it? >> yeah, the christmas tree. it's looking beautiful. harold ford jr. is still with us and co-founder of the no labels organization, market mckinnon, also with us, "fortune" magazine's leigh gallagher. mark, good to see you. jeff zucker. >> a struggling -- >> taking over cnn. >> looking to jz. >> jeff zucker to run the joint. >> that would be interesting. >> smart guy if see what happens. all right. well, good, good. so how is our republican party -- so mark mckinnon, it's been a very, very rough month for you as a republican. you haven't shaved since the election. >> ah. >> you're not -- >> looking very handsome. >> you're not brushing your hair. >> well. >> your scarves look a little out of touch with the rest of your outfit like this
or have less of a deficit is to let the economy grow. raising tax rates on rich people will not help the economy grow. in fact, it will send the economy in the wrong direction. >> i understand. i know you signed a pledge and you're sticking to that pledge with regard to the people you represent. so let me move on and ask you this, senator. you have indicated you are interested in running for president. tell me this, here, how exactly -- how interested are you and have you taken -- i know you smile because you've been asked it before, but let me ask you as well, have you taken any concrete actions to start lining up support? honest answer, please. >> well, you know, i've said i won't deny that i'm interested. little bit different than i am interested. >> let's read between the lines. what does that mean, sir? >> i want to be part of the national debate. i think my party, the republican party is shrinking. we're in danger of becoming a dinosaur. we're not competitive on the west coast. we're not competitive in new england. we weren't competitive around the great lakes. so we need a new
, unbelievable, it is up to half a billion dollars. >> probably going to be as large as the deficit by next week. seems like everyone is buying tickets unless sadly you live in one of those states -- tsk, tsk -- those eight states that don't take part in powerball. >> you should move. >> it is un-american. >> these are some of the many called powerball refugees. many live in california. doesn't allow you to buy powerball. they have crossed the state line into arizona to buy tickets. powerball not played in california, nevada, utah, wyoming, mississippi, and alabama. >> imagine, california, huge state. imagine if they can get in the mix, the jackpot would be incredible. ooh. all that powerball jack pot, the topic of our facebook question yesterday. >> we wanted to know what would you do with all that prize money? vanessa said, buy a home where my family lives, donate to alzheimers research, help those who've helped me, help some homeless people, donate to a veterans home, feed hungry children. why don't you try solving world peace, too, vanessa. that is very altruistic of you. kudos. >> joseph, i
deficit. and i know we have seen this morning also several editorial writers indicate the same, that it is important that we put these drivers of the deficit on the table and include them as part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. as the speaker said, we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something that we didn't do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiations. we still believe that it is most important for us to address the economic situation in this country where so many people are out of work. and that's why we take the position and believe strongly that increasing marginal rates is income tax rates is not the way to produce growth and to put people back to work. but we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of this administration to talk about the real problem that we're trying to fix. i'm told that mr. bolz, some of us will meet with him later today, has said earlier this morning that there's been no serious discussion by the white house on entitlements on medicare and medicaid. this has to be a part of this agreement or else we
? >> absolutely and i don't mean just senators. there's no question i believe the severity of our deficits and the future problems ahead of us are going to have to be addressed bay combination of revenue increase -- >> the question is larry, are they listening and are they prepared to make compromises that they were not prepared before? >> i think so. >> why do you think so? >> i think maybe it's the openness of the dialogue. in august of 2011 when we had this problem, you did not hear any ceo speak up. you did not hear a public discord about this. i actually believe the militancy of the ceos today is a very different phenomenon. maybe the timing is different. maybe the atmosphere is different. everybody is speaking out. one ceo may have a different opinion than another one. but the fact is an open dialogue, and an open dialogue is a democratic process. >> do you think the president should appoint a businessman or maybe even a republican person who supported romney and the secretary of treasury to send a message? >> i think we're going to live in a very volat >>> an
in an opinion piece this week that the president's health care reform must be included in deficit negotiations. >>> before you tell your kids a story of christmas, listen up. the pope is out with a new book, and it debunks a lot of details about jesus' birth. more on that later on this hour. >> here on the help desk we're talking about paying down debt and saving for the future. with me this hour are greg olson and carmen. greg, this question is for you. suzanne told us the more she spends on paying off her debt, the less she has to save. >> how do we balance between saving for the future and paying down some credit card debt? >> you know, those bills come in, and you see that debt, and your eyes just pop out of your head. >> it's an easy question, but i'm very glad she asked it because it's something that most people get wrong. unless you have an introductory rate or you're paying a sfwler 0% introductory rate and have the ability to transfer that in the future, low credit card debt rates are considered 12% right now. show me where you can get an investment that's going to net on an after tax
, bring entitlement reform into the conversation. social security sed aside. doesn't add to the deficit. but when it comes to medicare and medicaid, protect the integrity of the program but give it solvency for more and more years. >> congressman bill pascrell is a democrat from new jersey. thank you for talking with us. >> soledad, how are you this morning? >> i'm really well, thank you. i've had many, many days off. what are the democrats willing to give? you heard dick durbin there. tick off for me and be specific, what are democrats willing to give on in this negotiation? >> well, i think the senator's absolutely correct, we need to compromise. there's no question about that. and we will not, however, in any way, shape or form, jeopardize the planned benefits for social security. i mean that's kind of installed in the american people. we changed social security over the years in order to meet the demands that the program insists upon. we will do that. but we'll do that in a bipartisan fashion. >> okay, so compromise. social security is off the table. medicare, walk me through what a
a handle on the deficit. it also has a lot of people saying wait a minute. some of these decisions could really impact -- and not a good way -- have a huge impact on the poor and elderly. for ceo lloyd blankfein, he did an interview over the weekend with cbs and made the case that the social safety net programs need to be scaled back like medicare, medicaid and social security. he says people need to lower their expectations of those sboi entitlements. easy for him to say. he made about $12 million last year. i digress. he did con socede that eventual the way to raise revenue will be for the wealthy to pay a higher tax rate. david coney is talking about addressing the entitlement issue but wants a corporate tax rate of zero. no doubt that would create huge outrage. he says that's the most effective way to create jobs in the u.s. and frees up so much money for companies to hire. many would probably agree that's important, too. you can see both sides of the story there, carol. one more extreme than the other, of course. >> of course. we'll see what happens. alison kosik at the new york sto
penny to the deficit. we should put together something like a simpson/bowles commission. right now it's going to last for another 22 years untouched, but let's make sure it's stronger, longer. but when it comes to the other entitlement programs, medicare and medicaid, we've got to make certain that we preserve these basic programs, not to go the route of the paul ryan voucherizing, leaving senioring vulnerable for health insurance they cannot find or cannot afford. but make sure we change the program to save the money, reduce the increase in health care costs. medicaid is the one i'll add, joe, that concerns me the most. it has the least politically articulate constituency. these are the poorest people in america. we've got to make sure at the end of the day, we protect the children, mothers with babies, and particularly the frail elderly being covered by medicaid. we can make changes there and preserve the basic integrity of these programs. >> well, of course, people in medicaid don't have the aarp fighting for them day in and day out, running 30-second ads. isn't that one of the gre
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23